Day 11c. An Alpine Adventure: Klosters Museum = 11th September 2018

______________________________________________________________________________

Harriet & I walked up quite a few streets from Hotel Alpinea and finally found this small museum. The museum was a very rustic building built with wooden logs and hand-adzed timbers and a split wooden shingle roof. Every thing in the museum is handcrafted from the 17th -19th century. It had a very personal quality to everything on display.

Outside the Museum

A big wooden sign marking the entry to the museum.

As was said above: The museum is a very rustic building built with wooden logs and hand-adzed timbers. Every thing in the museum is handcrafted from the 17th -19th century. It had a very personal quality to everything on display. Harriet and I love handmade things rather than machine built things. This is why we went to find the museum up many side streets.


Whimsical humanoid figures adorn the outside of the museum entry.

The sign on the artist was in the Switz language so I couldn’t read it.


This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is IMG_8541-1024x768.jpg

Another view of the museum as a very rustic building built with wooden logs and hand-adzed timbers. Entry into the museum is via a set of hand-adzed timber steps that goes from the Ground floor to Floor 1. See the photograph below.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is IMG_8602-1-768x1024.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is IMG_8551-1024x768.jpg
An outside small storage shed.
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is IMG_8550-1024x768.jpg
A handmade timber table and seat for outside use.
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is IMG_8536-1024x768.jpg
The museum set among big pine trees with mountains in the background. The museum is not huge and spacious but is hand-worked where every bit of space is used. See the photographs below.
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5071-1024x768.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is IMG_8546-2-768x1024.jpg
My wonderful wife Harriet on a seat outside the museum.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Inside the Museum

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5000-1024x768.jpg
A wooden bucket that people in Klosters would have used in the early days of 1660’s.



This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5001-1024x768.jpg

Copper kettles.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5002-1024x768.jpg

A bed used by Klosters people in the 19th century. The bed is now covered with small historical items.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5003-1024x768.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5005-1024x768.jpg
A babies pull-cot for being pulled around the streets of Klosters in earlier years.

A big Bible from 1667 on a table for reading.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is IMG_8561-1-768x1024.jpg
A padded babies cot from earlier years.





This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5008-1024x768.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5009-1024x768.jpg

Plates used around 1880.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5012-1024x768.jpg

A small water tank and tap ….. the water flowed into a metal basin. It is not the same as running water we have in our houses in the 21st century.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5014-1024x768.jpg

A small set of steps leads up to a 3rd floor in the museum.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5015-1-1024x768.jpg

Up on the third floor was a spinning wheel for making cloth from which clothes could be made by hand. See the samples of clothes in the adjacent cupboard. It is a bit different to clothes being made by machines in the 21st century.

Look at these websites:

Environmental Impact of clothing today

What Happens When Fashion Becomes Fast, Disposable And Cheap?

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is IMG_8566-1024x768.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is IMG_8567-1024x768.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5018-1024x768.jpg

A cupboard on which is shelf for balls and rolls of wool for stitching clothes.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is IMG_8568-1024x768.jpg

A sowing machine used for making clothes by hand. I well remember my mother Norma Aitken had one of these machines in the 1960’s when we lived on a banana plantation at Wilsons Creek, Mullumbimby, the Northern Rivers area of New South Wales in Australia.

See the post on my Personal Experiences website:

Wilsons Creek where Ken Aitken Grew Up in the 1950’s and 1960’s ….

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is IMG_8572-1024x768.jpg

A table and chair for general reading and work.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5017-1024x768.jpg

A cupboard with ornate hand woodcarving.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is IMG_8574-1024x768.jpg

A wardrobe with ornate hand woodcarving.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is IMG_8576-1024x768.jpg

An open shelf displaying many small historical items.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5019-1024x768.jpg

A handmade chair … beautifully crafted.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5026-1024x768.jpg

A small bed with a chamber pot under the bed. This means you do not have to go outside to wee at night in the dark. You just do it in the chamber pot and take it outside in the morning to empty it.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5027-1024x768.jpg

A small table with a small oil wick lamp and an early telephone. A handmade chair sits beside the table.

See these websites:

History of the telephone – Wikipedia

http://oldtelephones.com/the-history/

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5030-1-1024x768.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5031-1-1024x768.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is IMG_8570-1024x768.jpg

Wall of guns / pistols used in earlier years. There is one that isn’t a pistol but is a small bag for carting gunpowder. When a shot was fired, the pistol would need to be reloaded with a lead bullet and some gunpowder. The trigger fired a hammer which caused a spark to light the gunpowder and fire the bullet at the target.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5034-1024x768.jpg

An old hand-turned gramophone. The handle was turned a number of times which wound a spring to turn the gramophone plate or turntable. On the turntable was placed a record with fine grooves of recorded music. Music was played when the gramophone head with a fine pin was carefully lowered on to the record.

Read this website: How the Wind-up Gramophone or Phonograph Worked

Here are some pieces of the writing relevant to the gramophone in the museum:

  • Wind up the motor using the handle on the right side of the cabinet. The clockwork motor could play eight to ten songs before needing to be rewound.
  • Place the record on the turntable and place the needle (it wasn’t called a stylus then) in the take-up groove at the outer edge of the record.
  • Operate the start lever to play the record.

Because of the high turntable speed and the coarse groove pitch, a ten-inch record only lasted two and a half minutes per side. This is why the popular songs of the era were never longer than two and a half minutes. If it wouldn’t fit on a record, it wouldn’t sell.

How Did it Work?

A hundred years ago, microphones, amplifiers, and loudspeakers hadn’t been invented, or at least they were still in the laboratory stage, so music had to be recorded and played back acoustically. A record’s groove was not perfectly smooth, but carried the imprint of the original sound wave in the form of a microscopic, side-to-side meandering in the groove. The needle followed this meandering more or less faithfully, and the resulting vibration was transferred by mechanical coupling to a small circular diaphragm mounted vertically in the head of the tone arm. The tone arm was hollow and made of brass. It carried the sound down below the turntable to a flared plywood horn that had its mouth just behind the top doors mentioned earlier. The exponential horn is often wrongly described as an acoustic amplifier. It is, in fact, an acoustic transformer, coupling the vibrational energy of the diaphragm more efficiently with the surrounding air. (Trumpets and trombones work exactly the same way.)

Slow, Slow, Quick, Quick

Another wonder of this old machine was that it could play about twenty minutes of music on a single wind-up, without ever slowing down. Then, suddenly, it would slow down and stop all in a few seconds. It managed this because in the heart of the clockwork motor was a beautiful little device called a centrifugal governor. This technology had actually been around for over a hundred years, controlling the speed of steam engines. The governor is driven at speed by the motor and is geared up. This causes the brass balls to swing outwards and upwards on their pivoted arms. The upwards movement lifts a collar, which is in turn coupled to (in the case of a steam engine) a steam valve, or (in our humble gramophone) a simple, felt friction pad. The net effect is the same: The faster it tries to go, the more it is held back, resulting in constant speed from fully wound to almost fully unwound.

Just a Few Facts

  • The tone arm had to be heavy because, with no amplification, all the energy had to come directly from the needle in the groove.
  • A needle lasted only for about six plays, then it was too blunt to follow the groove.
  • Needles were graded loud, medium, or soft. They came in little metal boxes of 100.
  • Before 78 rpm was standardised, records were made to play at a range of speeds. 76 and 80 were not uncommon. Some even played from the inside out.
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5037-1024x768.jpg

Some beautiful bottles and jars used for decorative purposes.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5040-1-768x1024.jpg

A beautiful hand-made door.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5041-1024x768.jpg

A beautiful hand-made cupboard for a vase of flowers etc.

________________________________________________________________________________________

DOWN STAIRS ON FLOOR 1: Floor 1 had a demonstration of old tools used in the 17th -19th century.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5046-1024x768.jpg

Old wooden planes.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5047-1024x768.jpg

A photograph of a house being built by this team of keen builders.This would have been in the 19th century when photography was invented. Read the website: The History of Photography – Nicephore Niepce House Photo Museum

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5048-1024x768.jpg

An old grinder for sharpening blades ….. hand turned, an old steel rake, and old saw. Again a photograph of a house being built.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5049-1-1024x768.jpg

An old wooden headed mallet. Read the website:
Mallet – Wikipedia

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5050-1024x768.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5051-1024x768.jpg

A big variety of many different tools from squares on the right side of the display to files then to chisels.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5054-1024x768.jpg

Cow bells are used extensively in Switzerland. Read the website:

Cowbell – Wikipedia A cow bell or cowbell is a bell worn by freely roaming animals made to scare off any predators. Although they are typically referred to as “cow bells” due to their extensive use with cattle, the bells are used on. The importance of the cow bell is highlighted in Swiss folklore, which reflects a period when a great Trychel, ..

The bell and clapper are commonly crafted from iron, bronze, brass, copper, or wood. The collar used to hold the bell is traditionally made with leather and wood fibers.

Most cow bells are made of thin, flat pieces of plated sheet metal. Plating causes the sheet metal to have a surface which can be decorated or left plain. The craftsmanship of cow bells varies by geographic location and culture. The ornaments on the cow bell and the collar are usually decorative although some cultures believe that certain ornaments provide or enhance magical protections such as the power to prevent or cure fever and other illnesses.[citation needed] The cow bell is used to keep track of grazing animal herds such as goats, reindeer, sheep and cows. They are mainly used in Europe, Mediterranean areas and Latin America, but are also used worldwide by those who practice transhumance, including nomadic pastoral tribes in Africa and Asia.[2][3]

Different bells can have specific sounds to identify important characteristics of the animals, such as age, sex, and species. Some cultures have even developed names to differentiate between bells and their tones; for example, in Spanish “truco” refers to stud males, “esquila” to female goats or ewes, and “esquileta” for pregnant females and immature animals. Each of these bells possess unique sounds, shapes, and sizes.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5055-1024x768.jpg

An old home-made hen coop ….. a bit small for a hen coop but users would get a few eggs per day if the hens were watered and fed.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5057-1024x768.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5061-1024x768.jpg

A small table to rest a few things on.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5063-1024x768.jpg

A painted image of surrounding mountains with a village surrounded by as stonewall. A bell tower of a church rises over the village.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5064-1024x768.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5065-1024x768.jpg

Up in the ceiling on Floor 3, round logs have been used to support the ceiling. Split wooden shingles have been used on the outside to seal the roof.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5067-1024x768.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSCN5068-1024x768.jpg

The photograph shows how up in the ceiling on Floor 3, round logs have been used to support the ceiling. Two small sleds with outside iron slides to prevent wear and tear on the timber sled.

The practical use of sleds is ancient and widespread. They were developed in areas with consistent winter snow cover, as vehicles to transport materials and/or people, far more efficiently than wheeled vehicles could in icy and snowy conditions. Early designs included hand-pulled sizes as well as larger dog, horse, or ox drawn versions.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is IMG_8552-1024x768.jpg

A meal table used by Klosters people in earlier times.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is IMG_8554-1024x768.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is IMG_8555-1-768x1024.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is IMG_8558-1024x768.jpg

An open museum window signifies the end of an awesome time at Klosters Museum.

______________________________________________________________________________